RARE COLLECTOR GEMSTONES (fall 2010 update)


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RLKG10-235 - Fluorite - $ 350
Argentina

thumbnail, 24.88 x 13.57 mm ; 35.00 carats
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Fluorite from Argentina [db_pics/new2010/rlkg235a.jpg]
Fluorite from Argentina [db_pics/new2010/rlkg235b.jpg]Fluorite from Argentina [db_pics/new2010/rlkg235c.jpg]

Fluorites come in virtually all colors of the rainbow, and are some of the few gems that occur in multicolor stones. I've seen this type of Fluorite from China, but never from Argentina. The stone comes from a trusted source so I have confidence that it's genuine. The stone shows alternating purple, blue-green and golden-yellow color banding throughout. It's a very attractive gem with a standard "Emerald" cut. A beautiful, larger, multi-color Fluorite for any collector.


RLKG10-234 - Sapphire Bead - $ 270
Sri Lanka

thumbnail, 9.5 x 7.3 mm ; 3.59 carats
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Sapphire Bead from Sri Lanka [db_pics/new2010/rlkg234a.jpg]Sapphire Bead from Sri Lanka [db_pics/new2010/rlkg234b.jpg]

Sapphires is one of those gems that comes in virtually every color of the rainbow. With that said, this stone is nearly colorless (it has a slight golden overtone). It is a very gemmy, and unsually faceted bead of Sapphire, which is rather rare in my experience. The stone looks very attractive in the sunlight. I would certainly say this stone is a "collector" stone for the size, and unusual quality of the gem. A good Sapphire to add to a suite of gems, especially if you're into adding unusual stones to your collection.


RLKG10-237 - Ekanite - $ 220
Sri Lanka

thumbnail, 9.0 x 6.5 mm ; 1.43 carats
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Ekanite from Sri Lanka [db_pics/new2010/rlkg237a.jpg]Ekanite from Sri Lanka [db_pics/new2010/rlkg237b.jpg]

Ekanite is an extremely rare gem, and is relatively "new" to the gem world as it was only discovered a little over 50 years ago. Ekanite is one of the few radioactive gems as it contains Uranium and Thorium content. Nonetheless, these gems are highly sought after by collectors, and any time you can find a stone that's over 1 carat, it definitely increases the value of the stone as opposed to one that's less than 1 carat. Most Ekanites are brown in color, but this gem has an evident green color. This stone is only very very slightly included with a lovely Pear cut.


RLKG10-233 - Tourmaline - $ 385
Afghanistan

thumbnail, 8.0 mm ; 2.57 carats
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Tourmaline from Afghanistan [db_pics/new2010/rlkg233a.jpg]Tourmaline from Afghanistan [db_pics/new2010/rlkg233b.jpg]
Tourmaline from Afghanistan [db_pics/new2010/rlkg233c.jpg]Tourmaline from Afghanistan [db_pics/new2010/rlkg233d.jpg]

Tourmalines are beloved by dealers and collectors for their intense colors in various shades. Green Tourmaline is one of the most popular colors for the material in the world. This stone has a "Step Round" cut gem with a strong green color (with a slight yellow overtone). The stone is nearly eye clean, and is a nice size gem that would make for a ring or a pendant. Afghanistan has produced some very fine quality Elbaite gems and this stone is a good example of said material.


RLKG10-232 - Imperial Topaz - $ 330
Ouro Preto, Brazil

thumbnail, 9.1 x 6.1 mm ; 2.20 carats
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Imperial Topaz from Ouro Preto, Brazil [db_pics/new2010/rlkg232a.jpg]Imperial Topaz from Ouro Preto, Brazil [db_pics/new2010/rlkg232b.jpg]

The deposits around Ouro Preto have produced what are some of the most colorful and widely recognized Topaz in the world. The color of these pieces earned them the name "Imperial", and is oft deserved. Topaz is one of those gems that gets darker with larger stones, so little stones don't have the saturation that a larger stone typically has. This gem is a very attractive Imperial Topaz with a characteristic orange color that is associated with this material. The stone has an "Emerald" cut and is virtually eye clean. These gems are becoming harder and harder to obtain since so much of the material never reaches the open market.


RLKG10-230 - Star Sapphire (Unusual Color) - $ 625
Sri Lanka

thumbnail, 8.41 mm ; 3.80 carats
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Star Sapphire (Unusual Color) from Sri Lanka [db_pics/new2010/rlkg230a.jpg]Star Sapphire (Unusual Color) from Sri Lanka [db_pics/new2010/rlkg230b.jpg]

This is a very beautiful gemstone. Star Sapphires are among the most highly sought after of all the Sapphire varieties. These stones are cut when thin, fibrous inclusions are are oriented inside of the Sapphire crystal at the correct angle to properly show off the "legs" of the star. When these inclusions are numerous enough to make the stone translucent or opaque, they allow light to be reflected in such a way that a star floats across the top of the stone with movement. It is an amazing phenomenon that is only seen in a few gems around the world. The actual "legs" of the star in this stone are fairly sharp, with no breaks and decent consistency. The stone also exhibits a unique bronze-gold color. A great Star Sapphire gem from one of the premier localities for the material in the world.


RLKG10-229 - Moldavite (large stone) - $ 1200
Czech Republic

thumbnail, 23.75 x 17.22 mm ; 19.67 carats
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Moldavite (large stone) from Czech Republic [db_pics/new2010/rlkg229a.jpg]Moldavite (large stone) from Czech Republic [db_pics/new2010/rlkg229b.jpg]

Moldavite is often referred to as the "gem that fell to earth". This material is believed to have formed when a shower of meteorites fell in what is now the Czech Republich within a one hundred mile area around the Vltava River, which was once called the Moldau, and from which Moldavite gets its name. These stones are actually tektites and Moldavite is a one-of-a-kind tektite. There are many theories where Moldavite originated and the inability of science to resolve the issues with one conclusive explanation of the true origins of Moldavite causes it to remain one of the great mysteries of the gem world. Nonetheless, Moldvaite isn't often faceted into gems (usually it is left in it's original form or used for carvings - plus the very unusual form of the "rough" stones doesn't make for very good yield when it comes to cutting stones), and this is a very good size stone for this material. The stone has an "Oval" cut, and would make for a beautiful piece of jewelry. There are some slight bubble inclusions, which is a good indicator that it is authentic, and not a synthetic simulant. It's a unique stone, and most collectors don't have one in their collections. This is a huge example


RLKG10-228 - Citrine - $ 725
Brazil

thumbnail, 28.94 x 18.99 mm ; 31.86 carats
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Citrine from Brazil [db_pics/new2010/rlkg228a.jpg]Citrine from Brazil [db_pics/new2010/rlkg228b.jpg]
Citrine from Brazil [db_pics/new2010/rlkg228c.jpg]Citrine from Brazil [db_pics/new2010/rlkg228d.jpg]

Often times, one encounters Citrine gems on the market that were heated to turn them yellow. Typically these stones start out as natural Amethyst and are altered to create the yellow color. This stone is more than likely a heated gem that was once Amethyst. With that said, this stone is very good size, with great color saturation and unique cutting. It is virtually eye clean with a "Modified Marquise Twist Top" cut.


RLKG10-227 - Vesuvianite var. Californite - $ 600
California

thumbnail, 15.6 x 11.3 mm ; 8.10 carats
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Vesuvianite var. Californite from California [db_pics/new2010/rlkg227a.jpg]Vesuvianite var. Californite from California [db_pics/new2010/rlkg227b.jpg]

This material is a variety of Vesuvianite, that is sometimes called "California Jade". The name for this stone is actually pretty old, and dates back to the days of noted gemologist George Kunz who first described the material. At the time, he thought it was a new form of jade, but Vesuvianite is often confused for other minerals. This "Oval" cut stone is actually a very good quality gem for this material as it has great translucency, and amazingly rich color. The stone is a bit cloudy, but has a nice green color that shows up very well.


RLKG10-221 - Fire Opal (with Contra Luz color flash) - $ 140
Mexico

thumbnail, 7.8 x 6.5 mm ; 1.43 carats
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Fire Opal (with Contra Luz color flash) from Mexico [db_pics/new2010/rlkg221a.jpg]
Fire Opal (with Contra Luz color flash) from Mexico [db_pics/new2010/rlkg221b.jpg]Fire Opal (with Contra Luz color flash) from Mexico [db_pics/new2010/rlkg221c.jpg]
Fire Opal (with Contra Luz color flash) from Mexico [db_pics/new2010/rlkg221d.jpg]Fire Opal (with Contra Luz color flash) from Mexico [db_pics/new2010/rlkg221e.jpg]

Some of the most well known Fire Opal in the world is from Mexico. These stones are among some of the biggest, brightest and most intense color Fire Opals from North America. There has been a surge in the price of fine quality Fire Opal from Mexico in the last few years, as the material seems to be more and more difficult to obtain, especially in such vivid stones like this one. This "Oval Cabochon" cut gem has a golden color, but the most impressive aspect of the stone is the fact that it shows the highly desirable and seldom seen COLOR FLASH or "Contra Luz" effect which is the multicolor "rainbow"-like array that is seen when strong light is transmitted through the stone. Now the color flash is best seen in sunlight or with a strong flashlight against a black background, and this stone was photographed under a strong flashlight to show the color flash. When strongly lit, the stone shows flashes of blue, green, red and gold. These flashes of color are only seen in about 1% of all Mexican Fire Opals ! It's a very attractive stone, and would make a great piece of jewelry, or would stand on its own as a beautiful gem.


RLKG10-222 - Sillimanite Cat's Eye - $ 840
Orissa, India

thumbnail, 10.9 x 9.5 mm ; 8.48 carats
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Sillimanite Cat's Eye from Orissa, India [db_pics/new2010/rlkg222a.jpg]

Sillimanite is actually trimorphous with Kyanite and Andalusite which means that they have the same chemistry, but different crystal habits create different minerals, just like Brookite, Anatase and Rutile. Sillimanite is sometimes called "Fibrolite" because of the fibrous nature of the material. This is actually pretty rare material, and one of the few I've seen in this color. This stone has a very distinct "eye" and a really unusual "smoky" color. The stone has decent clarity as well. I photographed this stone with a strong penlight shining right on the stone to show the "eye" better, so it might not be as distinct depending on what lighting in which you're viewing the stone.


RLKG10-224 - Tourmaline - $ 470
Afghanistan

thumbnail, 9.2 x 7.5 mm ; 3.13 carats
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Tourmaline from Afghanistan [db_pics/new2010/rlkg224a.jpg]Tourmaline from Afghanistan [db_pics/new2010/rlkg224b.jpg]

Tourmalines are some of the most diverse and popular gems out there. This particular gem was cut from a piece of rough found a few years ago in Afghanisan The stone shows a light greenish-yellow color when looking through the table. One of the most impressive aspects of this gem is the fact that it is only very very slightly included which is remarkable for Tourmaline. The stone has an "Emerald" cut. Tourmaline is classified as a "Type 3" gemstone, as inclusions are almost always present, and accepted by dealers and collectors, so when you find a nearly clean stone like this, it's a real treat. I have to say that these stones are becoming harder and harder to find these days with so much gem Tourmalines coming out of Brazil and Africa lately.


RLKG10-225 - Zircon - $ 170
Sri Lanka

thumbnail, 7.1 x 6.0 mm ; 1.39 carats
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Zircon from Sri Lanka [db_pics/new2010/rlkg225a.jpg]Zircon from Sri Lanka [db_pics/new2010/rlkg225b.jpg]

These are some of my favorite Zircons in the world. They have the most distinctive green color with a slight "hazy" quality. It's very hard to describe as they seem to appear almost slightly metallic. Nonetheless, the color is beautiful, and green Zircons are not common on the gem market. This stone has a standard "Oval" cut, and is very very slightly included. You do not see many of these gems on the market these days, and a stone like this can help to complete any Zircon suite.


RLKG10-226 - Fluorite - $ 245
Argentina

thumbnail, 27.1 x 14.0 mm ; 35.10 carats
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Fluorite from Argentina [db_pics/new2010/rlkg226a.jpg]
Fluorite from Argentina [db_pics/new2010/rlkg226b.jpg]Fluorite from Argentina [db_pics/new2010/rlkg226c.jpg]

Fluorites come in virtually all colors of the rainbow, and are some of the few gems that occur in multicolor stones. I've seen this type of Fluorite from China, but rarely from Argentina. The stone comes from a trusted source so I have confidence that it's genuine. The stone shows alternating purple and yellow color banding throughout. It's a very attractive gem and is only very slightly included with an elongated "Emerald" cut.


RLKG10-223 - Rhodolite - $ 200
Sri Lanka

thumbnail, 8.6 x 6.0 mm ; 1.58 carats
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Rhodolite from Sri Lanka [db_pics/new2010/rlkg223a.jpg]Rhodolite from Sri Lanka [db_pics/new2010/rlkg223b.jpg]

Rhodolite Garnets are some of the most vivid and beautiful gems in the Garnet family. These stones are beloved for their great color and large size stones. The Rhodolites from Sri Lanka are amazingly attractive gems, and are fast becoming very popular among gem collectors, as this material is not very common. The larger stones from Sri Lanka are also very popular among collectors and dealer alike. This gem has a beautiful reddish-pink color, and is virtually eye clean. The cut on this stone is an "Oval" cut. It is a superb, good sized stone from what is proving to be one of the premier localities in the world for the material.



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Rob Lavinsky, rob@irocks.com

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